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giovanny2001
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Re: LOS 100 MEJORES PELOTEROS DE TODOS LOS TIEMPOS

75). Jim Thome

Jim Thome has to be the most disrespected power-hitter of our generation. He has never come close to winning an MVP Award despite putting together six 40+ home run seasons and a career OPS+ of 150. The ten most similar batters to Thome through the age of 36 according to baseball-reference.com include Mike Schmidt, Frank Thomas, Harmon Killebrew, Reggie Jackson, Willie McCovey, Mark McGwire, and Jeff Bagwell. All seven are above Thome on this list so that is spectacular company. Thome has a great chance to become the 8th player to reach 600 home runs (Griffey will make it six this year and A-Rod will make it seven next year.) Thome's legacy--as most are--will depend on how he finishes his career. If he reaches 600 home runs, 1,600 runs and RBIs, and 1,800 walks, he'll have to be considered among the 50 greatest players of all-time at a minimum.

76). Nolan Ryan

I've discussed some of the most underrated players of all-time but I have yet to get into the most overrated players of all-time--until now. There is a large contingent of baseball fans who actually think Nolan Ryan is the greatest pitcher of all-time. Now, I didn't say these were "informed" baseball fans but they exist nonetheless. The number of comments that I have received saying something to the effect of "you are an idiot. Nolan Ryan is the greatest pitcher ever. You should do some research before putting together a list like this" is mind-boggling. Poorly phrased "burns" do not change the fact that Ryan wasn't anywhere near the greatest pitcher of all-time. His ERA+ is amazingly low at 111. That means he was 11% better than the league average. That's good for 287th on the all-time list. Just to compare, Barry Zito's ERA+ is 121. Ryan is nowhere near the best pitchers like Pedro Martinez, Lefty Grove, Randy Johnson and Roger Clemens who all boast ERA+'s above 137. In 27 seasons, Ryan won exactly zero Cy Young Awards. His WHIP was an unimpressive 1.25. His career winning % is an awful .526. Ryan doesn't come close to stacking up against the best pitchers of all-time. That doesn't mean he wasn't good, though. He threw seven no-hitters which is the most in MLB history by a mile. He struck-out 5, 714 hitters which is the most in MLB history by a mile. He also finished in the top five of the Cy Young Voting six times. Those are impressive accomplishments but don't let Ryan's longevity fool you into rating him higher than he deserves. In the modern era, he has the most losses, walks, and wild pitches.

77). Hal Newhouser

Hal Newhouser is one of the more underrated pitchers in MLB history. He didn't appear in The Sporting News' list of the 100 greatest players in MLB history. There is no question that Newhouser's career was not the typical career of a great pitcher but that doesn't make it any less impressive. Newhouser won two MVP awards as a pitcher. Walter Johnson and Carl Hubbell are the only pitchers to win two. Newhouser also came in 2nd in the MVP Voting in 1946 just missing out on three consecutive MVPs. Newhouser led the league in wins four times, era twice, and strikeouts twice. Although Carl Hubbell rates slightly better than Newhouser because of his postseason performance, there is absolutely no reason why Hubbell should rate in the top 50 of all-time while Newhouser is nowhere to be found in the top 100. The Sporting News dropped the ball on that one.

78). Eddie Mathews

My subconscious tried like heck to rate Mathews more favorably. This list was the result of a long, drawn-out process, where player comparisons were made over and over again. Mathews ended up on the wrong end of most of those comparisons despite a fantastic career. Nobody has started a career in better fashion than Mathews. He hit 47 home runs and drove in 135 RBIs at the age of 21. No other 21-year old has come within 10 home runs of that mark. He entered the majors at 20 and proceeded to hit 338 home runs by the age of 28. Despite his vast power, Mathews never won an MVP Award and only finished in the top ten three times in 17 seasons. He did finish second on two occasions and could've won both times as his numbers were right in line with the winners.

79). Paul Waner

In the Clemente, Carew, Gwynn, Waner, Boggs hierarchy, Waner comes in second place due to having the most hits, best OPS+, and an MVP Award. It is amazing how close the numbers of those five players are. All hit between 3,000 and 3,152 hits. All had an OPS+ between 130 and 134. Waner gets the nod over Gwynn and Carew because he beat them by a miniscule amount in just about every category. Clemente got the nod over everyone because of his defense and the fact that his career was cut short. Had he not passed away at 37, he could've reached 3,500 hits. That's essentially the same as saying that he did as much as everyone else did in a shorter period of time.

80) Gaylord Perry

By the slimmest of margins, Perry comes in ahead of Ferguson Jenkins. Their careers were remarkably similar. Perry had a 117 OPS+. Jenkins had a 115 OPS+. Perry had a 1.18 WHIP. Jenkins had a 1.14 WHIP. Perry won 20+ games five times. Jenkins did it seven times. Those numbers are so close that differentiating Perry and Jenkins seems almost ridiculous. However, Perry gets the edge for four very small reasons. 1). He won two Cy Young Awards. Jenkins won one. 2). Albeit a slight one, Perry has the edge in ERA+ which is probably the most important category. 3). Perry pitched 5,300 innings. Jenkins pitched 4,500 innings. 4). As a result of #3, Perry won 314 games while Jenkins won 284. As I say below near the end of the Jenkins paragraph, if Nolan Ryan is among the top 80 players of all-time, then Perry is among the top 100.

81) Ferguson Jenkins

Fergie's career was very similar to Tom Glavine's as well as Perry’s. He had an OPS+ of 115 to Glavine's 118. Glavine finished first twice, second twice, and third twice in Cy Young Voting. Jenkins finished first once, second twice, and third twice. Glavine won 20+ games five times. Jenkins did it seven times. Neither player has overly impressive secondary statistics. Jenkins was a workhorse who pitched 4,500 innings and compiled 267 complete games. His numbers aren't overwhelming but if Nolan Ryan is among the top 80 players of all-time, then Jenkins is among the top 100. The Sporting News missed out on this one as well.

82). Tony Gwynn

Gwynn represents the dichotomy that arises when making a list like this. I’m not sure I’ve ever been in more awe of a player in my lifetime than Tony Gwynn. He was such an unbelievable hitter. He hit over .350 seven times in his career. His plate discipline was simply unbelievable. In 20 seasons, he struck out 434 times or 22 strike outs per year. His skill in seeing and hitting a baseball has not been equaled since he entered the league although Ichiro is working on that. While Gwynn’s abilities were remarkable, he is not the type of hitter who rates favorably among the best hitters in MLB history. To do that, a hitter must be able to produce runs. Gwynn—like Clemente, Carew, Waner, and Boggs— was a singles hitter. He drove in 100 RBIs only once. He scored 100 runs only twice. This, despite playing in one of the greatest offensive eras in MLB history. Gwynn never came close to winning an MVP Award although he did finish in the top ten seven times. He hit .394 in 1994 which was the highest batting average in MLB since 1941. He won eight National League batting titles which is tied for the most in NL history with Honus Wagner.

83). Rod Carew

I labored over the rankings of Gwynn and Carew. Their numbers are eerily similar. I gave Gwynn the advantage for a few small reasons. He finished with more hits, RBIs, home runs, and doubles. He had a better BB to K ratio. He had a better OPS+. He had a better batting average. He had a better Runs Created/9 Innings. Carew won an MVP while Gwynn didn’t but 1977 was a pretty weak year for baseball. Gwynn probably would’ve won the MVP that year with a number of his seasons. That’s not to take anything away from Carew. I just don’t feel comfortable giving Carew the advantage over Gwynn simply because he won an MVP Award without considering Gwynn’s slight advantage in just about all categories.

84). Eddie Murray

There are dynamic power hitters who post stellar OPS+ numbers with pretty good career totals. Then there are workman-like power hitters who put up monstrous career totals in large part because they played 20+ seasons. Murray is more of the latter. Murray is only the 4th player in MLB history to reach 3,000 hits and 500 home runs. Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, and Rafael Palmeiro are the others. Murray’s OPS+ is fairly unimpressive at 129 although that number isn’t necessarily indicative of his best playing stretch. That number was about 140 for his first 14 seasons. It wasn’t until Murray turned 35 and the subsequent seven seasons that followed that his OPS+ really took a beating. Murray finished in the top five of the MVP Voting six times but never won. Just to compare, A-Rod has also finished in the top five six times. Despite putting up impressive total numbers over his career, Murray only led the league in RBIs and home runs once each. He also never hit more than 33 home runs in a season which is hard to believe.

85). Rafael Palmeiro*

Murray gets the nod over Palmeiro because of his MVP finishes. Palmeiro finished in the top five of the MVP Voting once. Like Murray, Palmeiro is a member of the prestigious 3,000 hit/500hr club. Other than the MVP Voting, their careers are remarkably similar. Murray was probably the better player with respect to the league he was playing in thus the better MVP finishes. Palmeiro was consistent but was never on the level of Frank Thomas or Jeff Bagwell in terms of league-dominance.
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Re: LOS 100 MEJORES PELOTEROS DE TODOS LOS TIEMPOS

86). Al Simmons

Simmons had a 20-year career but only 11 of those seasons were good. The other 9 as a whole were actually pretty bad. Still, those 11 good seasons were really good. He drove in 100+ RBIs in each of his first 11 seasons in the majors. Over that stretch he had six 200+ hit seasons and hit over .350 six times as well. Simmons never won an MVP but probably should’ve won the 1925 MVP in which he finished second to the worst MVP-winner in MLB history, Roger Peckinpaugh. There would’ve been a fantastic debate between Simmons and Harry Heilmann. They each had great seasons. Peckinpaugh did not, however. Simmons finished with a 132 OPS+ which is the same as Palmeiro. Palmeiro gets the edge for a few reasons. 1). He did his damage in a 30-team league while Simmons played in a 16-team league. It’s much more difficult to win—or even finish in the top five—an MVP in the latter. 2). Palmeiro has slightly better career totals. 3). Palmeiro was consistent throughout his career while Simmons was good for the first half and weak for the second half of his career. 4). Palmeiro had 1,700 more at-bats and still managed to equal Simmons in OPS+.

87) Charlie Gehringer

According to many lists, I have underrated Gehringer. He was a great player but I think this is where he belongs. His OPS+ was 124 which is one of the lowest of anyone on this list. He also never had a OPS+ of 150 or more in any season. Just to compare, Wade Boggs did that five times. Gehringer won the 1937 MVP and should’ve won the 1934 MVP as well. He lost to his teammate, Mickey Cochrane. Cochrane’s numbers weren’t even remotely comparable to Gehringer’s but I’m guessing he got the edge because he played catcher. Gehringer had unbelievable plate discipline that allowed him to walk 1,186 times to only 372 strike outs.

88) Mickey Cochrane

Cochrane was a great player in his own right. Although it is true that Cochrane won two MVPs to Gehringer’s one, I’m not going to hold that against Gehringer. One of those MVPs was questionable at-best as Gehringer had a much better season but finished 2nd. Only Roy Campanella and Yogi Berra won more MVPs from the catcher ***. Cochrane finished in the top ten of the MVP Voting six times. He also boasts a 128 OPS+ which is actually better than Gehringer’s. Gehringer played longer and had more productive seasons which is why he gets the edge. Cochrane was a key component to three World Series-winning teams. Cochrane’s career was tragically cut short at the age of 34 when he was hit in the head by a pitch. He recovered physically but never played baseball again.

89). Juan Marichal

Marichal doesn’t have any hardware in the form of MVPs or Cy Young Awards but he was the second best pitcher in the NL in ’64,’65, ’66, and ’68. The Cy Young wasn’t given out in each league until 1967 so he doesn’t have a slew of top five finishes like the rest of the pitchers on this list. Marichal finished in the top five in wins five times and ERA six times. He led the league in wins twice and ERA once. He won 20+ games six times. He had excellent control as evidenced by his 3.25 to 1 career K to BB ratio. His ERA+, WHIP, and Winning % are better than Tom Glavine’s and Nolan Ryan’s.

90). Wade Boggs

Every time I look at Boggs’ career stats, I’m more impressed. He was a “singles” hitter for the most part but he had some incredible seasons. Like Al Simmons, though, Boggs’s career declined sharply during the second half which is why he rates so low. Boggs had seven years of a 140 or better OPS+ in his first tens seasons. He only had one such year over his last eight seasons and that was in a year he played fewer than 100 games. Still, Boggs had a great run. He is the only player in MLB history to have seven consecutive seasons of 200+ hits, 100+ runs, and 30+ doubles. In all but one of those seasons he had at least 40 doubles. Boggs led the league in a number of categories throughout his career including OBP six times, batting average five times, walks twice, runs twice, and OPS twice. He also led the league in intentional walks six times. Boggs also had unbelievable plate discipline as he walked almost twice as many times as he struck out over his career. Despite his impressive numbers, Boggs never finished better than 4th in MVP Voting and only finished in the top ten four times.

91). Sammy Sosa*

What do you do with a guy like Sosa? He is the ultimate paradox. He is a power hitter with a dreadful OPS+ (at least with respect to his power-hitting peers). Sosa has blasted 609 home runs for a whopping OPS+ total of 128. Remember, Eddie Murray also had a OPS+ of 128 and he never hit more than 32 home runs in a season. Sosa hit at least 40 home runs seven times. He hit at least 63 home runs three times which is the most 60+ home run seasons in history. So, you might guess that Sosa is a home-run or bust hitter and you’d be right. You also might guess that his OBP is weak and thus his plate discipline is weak. You’d be right again. Sosa’s OBP is .344. His K to BB ratio is worse than 2 to 1 which is terrible. Sosa doesn’t possess the requisite numbers to be ranked in the top 50 or even the top 90. Just to compare, Mark McGwire—Sosa’s home run counterpart in the late 90s—had an OPS+ of 162, an OBP of .394, and an K to BB ratio of nearly 1 to 1. There is a world of difference between those sets of numbers. However, Sosa hit a ton of home runs, won an MVP Award, and finished in the top ten seven times. His career is clearly worth noting. An interesting statistic about Sosa is that he never led the league in home runs in any of his 60+ homer seasons. He led the league twice when he hit 50 and 49 home runs, respectively.

92) Sam Crawford

Crawford was 39 hits away from immortality. Had he reached the 3,000-hit mark, he would’ve been a part of that exclusive club when it only featured five players: Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, Tris Speaker, Nap Lajoie, and Eddie Collins (Cap Anson did it as well but he played his entire career before 1900 and thus before MLB formed as we know it today). Instead of being in that group, Crawford is lumped in with the tens of thousands of other baseball players who didn’t reach 3,000 hits. A logical viewpoint reveals that 39 hits doesn’t define a baseball player. Crawford proved his worth on the field. Crawford led the league in RBIs three times, HRs twice, runs twice, and triples six times. He is the all-time leader in triples. It’s important to remember that in the early 1900s, triples meant something. They weren’t just a freak occurrence like they are today. Crawford finished in the top ten in just about every relevant offensive category from 1905 to 1915. His numbers are truly astonishing when you take into consideration that he rates 9th in the history of baseball in the Gray Ink Test which measures the number of a times a player finished among the league leaders in different categories.

93) Dave Winfield

Big Dave Winfield is a tough player to judge. He certainly has the career numbers to deserve recognition but his per-year averages aren’t all that impressive. According to baseball-reference.com, Winfield’s career is most similar to Eddie Murray’s. The are a few differences, however. Murray finished in the top five in the MVP Voting six times including two second place finishes. Winfield never finished first or second and only finished in the top five three times. Murray also had more RBIs, hits, doubles, and home runs. It isn’t by much but Murray gets the nod.
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Re: LOS 100 MEJORES PELOTEROS DE TODOS LOS TIEMPOS

94) Paul Molitor

Molitor is one of the more underrated players in baseball history. There is a lot to like about his career accomplishments. He had 3,319 hits which is 9th on the all-time list. Molitor is also 11th on the all-time doubles list and 19th all-time in runs. Even more impressive is that Molitor is one of only four players in MLB history to reach 3,000 hits, 500 SBs, with a batting average above .300. The other three are Ty Cob, Honus Wagner, and Eddie Collins. Molitor is the only player to accomplish that in the last 80+ years. Molitor’s career is impressive enough from his regular season statistics alone. His postseason accolades make him more impressive, yet. In 117 postseason at-bats, Molitor hit .368 with a 1.050 OPS. In 66 World Series at-bats, he hit .418 with a 1.111 OPS. Molitor has the highest batting average in World Series history (min. 60 at-bats) and the highest batting average in playoff history (min. 100 at-bats). Molitor’s postseason success won him the 1993 World Series MVP.

95) Mike Piazza

Piazza is certainly the greatest hitting catcher of all-time but that’s not why he’s on this list. He has bullied opposing pitchers at a rate that would be impressive for any ***. He finished in the top ten of the league MVP Voting seven times including back to back 2nd place finishes in ’96 and ’97. His overall statistics don’t look overly impressive but--as what happens to all catchers--his career has taken a downward turn as he reached his mid-30s. His best days are clearly behind and it’s unlikely that he has enough left in the tank to reach 500 home runs (he needs 73 more). However, Piazza’s OPS+ stands at 142 which is extremely impressive considering that number has taken a huge hit over the past four seasons. Piazza has posted six seasons with an OPS+ above 150. Just to compare, Johnny Bench, Yogi Berra, Roy Campanella, and Mickey Cochrane combined to do it five times.

96). Cal Ripken Jr.

Ripken would be one of the more underrated players of all-time but I’m not sure there are as many people overrating him as there used to be. He was a great player, no doubt, but he is at the end of the top 100 at best. He is best known for “The Streak” but he also won two AL MVPs and finished with 3,184 hits. Ripken’s career represents a unique dichotomy. It was average with excellence sprinkled in. In 21 seasons, he only finished in the top 15 of the MVP Voting four times. It just so happens that two of those four times he won the MVP. You might be tempted to think that any two-time MVP winner has to be one of the top 100 players of all-time. But, that’s not the case. Robin Yount, Dale Murphy, Roger Maris, and Juan Gonzalez are two-time winners who don’t crack the top 100 in my estimation. Ripken’s OPS+ is borderline-horrible for an all-time great at 112. I don’t mean to take anything away. He brought something to baseball that was totally revolutionary and that was a shortstop who could hit. It’s just important not to get carried away with Ripken’s reputation.

97). Ernie Banks

Banks has to be the most overrated hitter in baseball history. Don’t confuse “overrated” with “not good” because Banks was clearly good or I wouldn’t have him anywhere close to the top 100. However, The Sporting News has him as the 38th best player of all-time. Banks had five great seasons and all take place between the ages of 24 and 29. David Ortiz has had five great seasons and nobody thinks Ortiz should rate better than Banks at this point. Banks was slightly above average for his remaining 14 seasons. His career OPS+ is a weak 122 which is one of the five lowest of anyone in the top 100. Banks led the league in home runs twice and RBIs twice which is decent but certainly not worthy of a ranking anywhere near the top 50.

98). Dennis Eckersley

As I mentioned previously, I am not fond of putting relievers among the 100 greatest players. I only have two in the top 100. Rivera is by far the greatest of all-time and I think “Eck” has to be considered the second best of all-time. Eckersley was a converted starting pitcher but unlike most starters-turn-relievers, “Eck” was actually a pretty good starting pitcher having been selected to two All-Star games. As a starter, he won 151 games by the age of 30 and won at least 13 games seven times. Clearly, the A’s saw something in “Eck” that told them he could be a dominating reliever. Success came almost immediately as he picked up 45 saves and finished 2nd in the Cy Young Voting and 5th in the MVP Voting in his second season with Oakland. That was the start of five of the most brilliant pitching seasons the league has ever seen at least from a relief-perspective. In those five seasons, “Eck” never posted a WHIP above .92. In two of those seasons he delivered almost unfathomable WHIPs of .607 and .614. In 1990 he posted a .61 ERA. In 1992, Eck won the Cy Young Award and the AL MVP. He also won the ALCS MVP in 1988.

99) Brooks Robinson

I debated long and hard over whether Robinson should be included in this list. It’s more than just a numbers game for Robinson. His offensive stats are actually pretty weak. His OPS+ is incredibly weak at 104. But, Robinson was important. He came up big at the right times and he was the greatest defensive third-baseman of all-time. Robinson is one of only two players to win an MVP, World Series MVP, and All-Star game MVP. Frank Robinson, ironically, is the only other player to accomplish that feat. Robinson also finished in the top five of the MVP voting five times. An amazing footnote is that despite hitting a paltry .267 over 23 seasons (10,654 at-bats), Robinson only struck out 990 times in his career.

100). Ichiro Suzuki

Ichiro is slowly making history as one of the greatest speed/average combo hitters in MLB history. He has made the All-Star game and won a Gold Glove in all seven seasons of his career. He is the first player in MLB history to have seven consecutive seasons of 200+ hits, 100+ runs, 30+ steals, and a .300+ batting average. He won the AL MVP Award in 2001. The only thing keeping him from the top 50—and it’s a pretty big thing—is his 119 OPS+. He would rate ahead of Roberto Clemente if he could get that to 130. I’m not sure that number is reachable considering Ichiro’s lack of power.


Honorable mention (in no particular order): Duke Snider, beep Allen, Kirby Puckett, Derek Jeter, Billy Wagner, Trevor Hoffman, Goose Goslin, Orlando Cepeda, Ralph Kiner, Bill Terry, Gabby Hartnett, Bill Dickey, Ivan Rodriguez, Billy Williams, Zack Wheat, Robin Yount, George Sisler, Craig Biggio, Willie Keeler, Roberto Alomar, Albert Belle, Joe Medwick, Chuck Klein, Juan Gonzalez, Joe Cronin, Carlton Fisk, Todd Helton, David Ortiz, Ryne Sandberg, Gavvy Cravath, Frank Howard, Frank Chance, Frankie Frisch, Heinie Manush, Luke Appling, Tony Oliva, Jim Rice, Hack Wilson, Al Oliver, Lou Brock, Andre Dawson, Tony Perez, Carlos Delgado, Edgar Martinez, Tim Raines, Roger Maris, Dale Murphy, Fred McGriff, Jeff Kent, Early Wynn, Don Sutton, Hoyt Wilhelm, Goose Gossage, Bruce Sutter, Rollie Fingers, Jeff Reardon, Dizzy Dean, Lefty Gomez, Addie Joss, Catfish Hunter, Joe Wood, Dazzy Vance, Stanley Coveleski, Rube Waddell, Vida Blue, Brett Saberhagen, and Robin Roberts.
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Re: LOS 100 MEJORES PELOTEROS DE TODOS LOS TIEMPOS

[ Editado ]
Top 100 Baseball Players of All-Time (list only)

1) Babe Ruth
2) Ted Williams
3) Ty Cobb
4) Willie Mays
5) Barry Bonds*
6) Roger Clemens*
7) Walter Johnson
8) Lou Gehrig
9) Lefty Grove
10) Stan Musial
11) Joe DiMaggio
12) Christy Mathewson
13) Rogers Hornsby
14) Cy Young
15) Jimmie Foxx
16) Mickey Mantle
17) Tris Speaker
18) Randy Johnson
19) Honus Wagner
20) Greg Maddux
21) Hank Aaron
22) Pete Alexander
23) Albert Pujols
24) Alex Rodriguez
25) Mel Ott
26) Hank Greenberg
27) Warren Spahn
28) Tom Seaver
29) Frank Robinson
30) Bob Feller
31) Joe Jackson
32) Pedro Martinez
33) Ed Walsh
34) Mordecai Brown
35) Manny Ramirez
36) Nap Lajoie
37) Mike Schmidt
38) Jim Palmer
39) Vladimir Guerrero
40) Ken Griffey Jr.
41) Eddie Collins
42) Yogi Berra
43) Johnny Bench
44) Sandy Koufax
45) Carl Hubbell
46) Eddie Plank
47) Steve Carlton
48) Bob Gibson
49) Frank Thomas
50) Mariano Rivera
51) Reggie Jackson
52) Harmon Killebrew
53) Carl Yastrzemski
54) Mark McGwire*
55) Pete Rose
56) Joe Morgan
57) Rickey Henderson
58) George Brett
59) Roy Campanella
60) Jackie Robinson
61) Whitey Ford
62) Willie Stargell
63) Al Kaline
64) Curt Schilling
65) Gary Sheffield*
66) Jeff Bagwell
67). Johnny Mize
68) Johan Santana
69) Chipper Jones
70). John Smoltz
71). Tom Glavine
72) Willie McCovey
73) Harry Heilman
74). Roberto Clemente
75). Jim Thome
76). Nolan Ryan
77). Hal Newhouser
78). Eddie Mathews
79). Paul Waner
80) Gaylord Perry
81) Ferguson Jenkins
82). Tony Gwynn
83). Rod Carew
84). Eddie Murray
85). Rafael Palmeiro*
86). Al Simmons
87) Charlie Gehringer
88) Mickey Cochrane
89). Juan Marichal
90). Wade Boggs
91). Sammy Sosa*
92) Sam Crawford
93) Dave Winfield
94) Paul Molitor
95) Mike Piazza
96). Cal Ripken Jr.
97). Ernie Banks
98). Dennis Eckersley
99) Brooks Robinson
100). Ichiro Suzuki

Mensaje editado por giovanny2001

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Re: LOS 100 MEJORES PELOTEROS DE TODOS LOS TIEMPOS

Como podran ver, esta lista combina jugadores retirados con jugadores activos. Por los que sus resultados no son definitivos y son mas bien basados en proyecciones, en el caso de los jugadores que todavia participan en las grandes ligas.
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Re: LOS 100 MEJORES PELOTEROS DE TODOS LOS TIEMPOS

Muy mala noticia para el forista "clone" que dice que Roberto Clemente es el mejor pelotero de todos los tiempos, pues en esta lista en particular aparece en el lugar 74. Algo con lo que yo particularmente no estoy de acuerdo, pues creo que Clemente debe aparecer entre los primeros 20.
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Re: LOS 100 MEJORES PELOTEROS DE TODOS LOS TIEMPOS

Si de historia del beisbol (de todos los tiempos) se refiere, entonces hay que reconocer que el mejor jugador latino de beisbol de todos los tiempos fue el cubano Martin Dihigo. Fue el mejor jugador en la historia del beisbol latino y se encuentra en el Hall de la Fama.
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Re: LOS 100 MEJORES PELOTEROS DE TODOS LOS TIEMPOS

[ Editado ]

Como dice Gilbertico Santarosa:"Que alguien me diga?

Que hace ? o' Quien coloco' el nombre de Jeff Bagwell en esa "supuesta lista de los mejores 100???

Y adonde quedo' el nombre de Roberto Clemente????

Brook Robinson (El mejor tercera base de todos los tiempos.)

Ivan Rodriguez (El mejor Catchger de todos los tiempos)!!!!!

Roberto Alomar (el mejor segunda base)!!!!!!!!

Ozzie Smith (el mejor SS)!!!

Mickey Mantle.!!!!

Don Mattingly!!!

Ken Griffey Jr.!!

Incluso tendria que estar el nombre de Sammy Sosa.

Saludos

Fe de errata:

Acabo de ver que continuaste la lista,pero en verdad los nombres que mencione' deberian estar  entre los primeros 30 nombres.

Saludos nuevamente.

Mensaje editado por lluandies

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Re: LOS 100 MEJORES PELOTEROS DE TODOS LOS TIEMPOS

Con respecto a Jeff, yo tambien me hice la misma pregunta.

No creo que deba estar ni siquiera entre los primeros 300 jugadores, mucho menos entre los primeros 100. Pero como dije, cada vez que se haga una lista, dudo que dos personas puedan estar de acuerdo con ella.

Robre Clemente ya exprese que ponerlo en el numero 74 es un insulto.
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Re: LOS 100 MEJORES PELOTEROS DE TODOS LOS TIEMPOS

Dihigo fue un gran jugador. Uno de los mejores de su epoca.

Desafortunadamente aqui hablamos de las ligas mayores, y Dihigo aunque tuvo excelentes numeros, estos fueron diseminados en diferentes ligas y paises, como Mexico, Cuba, Dominicana, Puerto Rico y la liga de color.
LEONEL FERNANDEZ 2016-2050