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siboneyes
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GREAT DAY FOR AMERICA: SCOTT WALKER WON AND WON BIG

GREAT DAY FOR AMERICA: SCOTT WALKER WON AND WON BIG

Tuesday, June 05, 2012 8:54:54 PM by therightliveswithus

With 19 percent of precincts reporting, Scott Walker holds a lead of 61% to challenger Tom Barrett's 39%. With such a lead, Pundit Press can now project that Scott Walker will win his recall election.

Despite Unions pushing mightily against him and President Obama... tweeting his support for Barrett, Scott Walker has won decisively. Now he can concentrate on bring Wisconsin further into prosperity.

What the implications will be for November can only be surmised. However, there is no doubt that Walker's win is a stunning mandate against the President and in favor of responsible government.

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siboneyes
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Re: GREAT DAY FOR AMERICA: SCOTT WALKER WON AND WON BIG

WALKER VICTORY A ‘TIPPING POINT’IN PUBLIC SECTOR UNION PENSION REFORM.

by John Gizzi

June 5, 2012

Will Walker Win Ignite A Prairie Fire

Behind Pension Reform?

WAUKESHA, Wisc. — Perhaps the most lasting legacy of Scott Walker’s “walk through fire” and triumph in the recall election Tuesday could well be an enhanced movement in other states behind limiting what state employees can expect in terms of benefits from the state.

The movement by labor unions that culminated in making Walker only the third governor in U.S. history to face recall from voters (and the only one to survive) began when he and the Republican controlled legislature passed Act Ten, which required many public employees in Wisconsin to pay for six percent of their pensions and 12 percent of their health care premiums.

Act Ten also ended collective bargaining for all benefits and work rules except salary for the same public employees — something more than a few observers here say was the key reason behind the labor-fueled drive that recalled two GOP state senators last year, almost recalled a state supreme court judge who had upheld the act, and put Walker on the ballot.

“If Walker had not pushed collective bargaining, the unions in all likelihood might have let it go, swallowed the pension reforms, and not pushed the recalls,” said one veteran Madison journalist, recalling how Wisconsin in 1959 became the first state to give collective bargaining rights to public employees.

Neighboring Illinois, which is wracked by a massive $83 billion pension system debt, could easily be the next battleground on the issue of pension reform. With Democrats controlling the governorship and both houses of the legislature, state House GOP Leader Tom Cross was unable to get anywhere with his proposal for reducing cost-of-living increases in teacher retirement plans. But Republicans are expected to make this a key issue in their fall campaign, when all 59 Senate seats and all 118 House seats are on the ballot.

The problem reform advocates will have in Illinois is that an estimated 96 percent of public employees are unionized — a sharp contrast to the rest of the country. The Wall Street Journal reported recently that the ranks of public unions dropped dramatically. Members of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees plunged by two thirds in recent years — from 22,300 to 7,100 — and the American Federation of Teachers has dropped from 17,000 to 6,000, reported the Journal.

Bob Williams, former Washington State legislator and now president of the Budget Solutions group that seeks answers to major problems in the states, has long called unfunded pension liabilities “the dark cloud on the horizon of the states,” totaling trillions of dollars. Walker’s victory, he told Human Events, “will accelerate the movement toward overhaul of the pension system that is just getting started in several states.”

“The results will give politicians across the country courage to address unsustainable spending by public sector unions,” businessman Eric Hovde, a candidate for the GOP Senate nomination in Wisconsin, predicted to us. “What Gov. Walker went through was the tipping point.”

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sirjohn
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Re: GREAT DAY FOR AMERICA: SCOTT WALKER WON AND WON BIG

[ Editado ]

Walker Walks the Talk, Obama talks  about the Walk

By Ken Blackwell

6/6/2012

 

Gov. Scott Walker Walked his Talk. He faced down a militant,  union-led effort to drive him from office. Scott Walker never lacked courage. It  took steely determination not to buckle in the face of militant unions who “occupied” the stately Wisconsin capitol in Madison when Walker’s reforms were  first voted on. For two years, leftists have been howling. One of their speakers  at a get out the (union) vote rally actually compared Scott Walker’s reforms to  the 9/11 attacks on our country. And this is the crowd that is forever lecturing  us on civility.

Gov. Walker’s stand up courage can be contrasted with  President Obama’s missing in action stance in the Wisconsin recall effort.  Badger State labor unionists have been hard pressed to explain to themselves or  to their supporters why the president they helped put in office has abandoned  them in their hour of need.

They ruefully recall how then Candidate Obama gave a ringing  endorsement to public sector employees’ collective bargaining agreements. He  went even further. In 2007, he said:

"[I]f American workers are being denied their right to  organize when I'm in the White House, I will put on a comfortable pair of shoes  and I will walk on that picket line with you as president of the United States,"  he told a crowd in Spartanburg, South Carolina, in November  2007.

Yet when reporters asked White House Press Secretary Jay Carney when  the President would visit Wisconsin, the spokesman blandly replied Mr. Obama had “no current plans”to enter the fray. What can have been his  hesitation?

This is an incomprehensible blunder. Mr. Obama actually flew  over the state twice during the hotly contested recall. Supporters might have  looked up to see Air Force One passing serenely overhead. Doubtless the  President was on board as he “tweeted” his pallid support for the embattled  Democrat, Tom Barrett. We can bet the president was wearing his comfortable pair  of shoes as he hit that “send” button.

Compare President Obama with President Reagan. In the summer  of 1981, Reagan was still recovering from a bullet in his chest. He nearly died  from an assassination attempt.

The union leaders of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers  (PATCO) decided to test Mr. Reagan’s resolve. They signaled they would lead  their workers out on strike if their wage and benefit demands were not met by  the federal government.

Ronald Reagan had been elected and re-elected president of the  Screen Actors Guild. He proudly told labor audiences he was the only union  president ever to run for President of the United States. He won 24% of  Democrats’ votes, many of them labor union members.

But President Reagan also believed that federal law must be  upheld. Federal law forbade government workers going out on strike. This was  especially urgent in the case of air traffic controllers. Such a strike could  cripple the already stricken U.S. economy.

Reagan warned the PATCO strikers to return to their jobs or  face dismissal. They called his bluff. He wasn’t bluffing. He fired them  all.

The world took note. In the Kremlin, the KGB reported “with  Reagan, words are deeds.”The world is taking note of President Obama now, too.  With Obama words are, well, words.

Gov. Walker walked the path Ronald Reagan blazed. Barack  Obama’s promise to walk the picket lines with union strikers rings hollow this  morning. Like so many of his other campaign promises. 

 
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sirjohn
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Re: GREAT DAY FOR AMERICA: SCOTT WALKER WON AND WON BIG

[ Editado ]

More Good News for  Freedom

By Carol Platt Liebau

6/6/2012

 

Every conservative is smiling about last night's results in  Wisconsin.

 
But -- hard as it is to believe -- there's reason to hope  that the message about how government employees are driving fiscal crisis has  sunk in even in California.
 
There, citizens of San Jose passed some serious pension  reform, which among other improvements requires city workers either  to contribute up to 16% more of their salary to continue with their current  pension plan or else choose a more affordable plan; requires voter approval for  future pension increases; and limits disability retirement to those who  disabilities actually prevent them from working.
 
Predictably, the government union -- subsidized by our tax  money and supposedly created to "serve us" -- threatens to sue the  city.
 
 
The best news?  These results signal that voters have  absorbed the message that small government advocates have been trying to spread:  There is no reason that government workers should have the "right" to a  lifestyle that completely insulates them from the impact of government  overspending and imprudence -- an impact that affects all other Americans.   Enough with the calls for "sacrifice" from everyone else in order to subsidize  an entitled class.
Carol  Platt Liebau is an attorney, political commentator and guest radio talk show  host based near New York. Learn more about her new book, "Prude: How the  sx-Obsessed Culture Hurts Young Women (and America, Too!)"
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sirjohn
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Re: GREAT DAY FOR AMERICA: SCOTT WALKER WON AND WON BIG

[ Editado ]

Walker, Unbowed: HISTORIC  TRIUMPH:

6,5,2012
 

The year-long saga of the  Wisconsin  recall is, at long last, over, and Scott Walker is still  standing. The low-key  Republican governor has withstood a sustained (and  expensive) onslaught from the  forces of Big Labor and its allies on the  Left that featured everything from the  coordinated cross-border retreat of  intransigent Democratic lawmakers, to the  occupation of the state house by  a band of radicals, bongo drummers, and  high-school truants, to ill-fated  attempts to nullify Republican legislative  majorities and pick off  uncooperative judges. Walker’s enemies did everything  but release the  kraken.

And yet, he won. Throughout, Walker has stayed  even-keeled,  evincing—if not exactly cockiness, then something like the  fatalism and serenity  of an innocent man in the middle of a trial for his  life. An equanimity, and a  faith that his reforms would be embraced by  Wisconsin voters, that turns out to  have been fully warranted.

Walker won because his reform program is popular, and  because  it is working. The governor’s personal approval numbers in  Wisconsin hover  around 50 percent — not bad for a man whom most  Wisconsinites have seen  Photoshopped into a Hitler mustache and Nazi  regalia at least once in the last  year. But more telling is the popularity  of Walker’s reforms. According to one  recent Reason-Rupe poll, 72  percent of Wisconsinites favor the  requirement that public-sector workers  increase their pension contributions to 6  percent of their salaries. And  71 percent favor making government employees pay  12 percent instead of 6  percent of their health-care premiums.

Such commonsense measures, which put public-sector  employees  on a more even footing with the taxpayers who pay their  salaries, have already  led to over $1 billion in savings across the state,  saving public-sector workers  from layoffs in the bargain. The reforms’ success has also neutralized them as  campaign issues for Walker’s  opponents, who were forced to turn away from the  very raison  d’être of the recall and emphasize  instead a  grab-bag of non-issues (Walker’s record on women’s rights?) and   non-controversies (vague and discredited whispers about a pending Walker   indictment and a secret college love child?) in the final weeks of the   race.

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sirjohn
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Re: GREAT DAY FOR AMERICA: SCOTT WALKER WON AND WON BIG

[ Editado ]

PART 2

Walker won because he represented the taxpayer, while  his  opponent represented the groups whose livelihoods depend on bilking  the  taxpayer. Milwaukee mayor Tom Barrett served as less of an alternative  than a  vessel for Big Labor’s unmoored wrath. Barrett raised a mere $4  million on his  own, while outside PACs did the heavy lifting — We Are  Wisconsin raised more  than $5.5 million in the last month alone, including  seven-figure donations from  AFSCME and the AFL-CIO, six-figure donations  from the National Education  Association and the American Federation of  Teachers, and a mere $720 from its  three (that’s three)  individual donors. The Left will complain that  Walker outspent  Barrett handily, but this is no vice considering Walker also  handily  outraised Barrett in individual donations, about three-quarters of which   were for less than $50. It was Walker’s strength, after all, that  convinced  national Democrats to stop spending on a race they didn’t think  they could  win.

And, most of all, Scott Walker saved his job by being  the  adult in the room. While Democrats in Washington seem to be relying on  their  belief that the United States government is “too big to fail” to  justify a  program of taxing and spending our way out of debt, the states  don’t have such a  luxury. And so, across the country, in states red, blue,  and purple, they have  turned to men like Scott Walker — and Chris  Christie, and Mitch Daniels, and  others — to close structural deficits,  stabilize out-of-control spending, and  break the death embrace between Big  Labor and Big Government. In taking this  toxic partnership head on, in a  state with a rich progressive history no less,  Walker became its biggest  target. His enemies spent a year and a half preparing  to take their best  shot at him. And a combined total of $100 million or so  later, they  missed. They missed because voters are starting to understand that   governing through crisis requires someone willing to make unpopular  choices,  stand up to entrenched interests, and hold the line against loud  and determined  opposition.

Quite simply, Wisconsin voters   realized that if they no longer had Scott Walker, they would have to  invent  him.

 

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sirjohn
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Re: GREAT DAY FOR AMERICA: SCOTT WALKER WON AND WON BIG

Five takeaways from Walker’s win

 

 

 

MADISON, Wisc. “Get outta here! I know what Human Events is, all right!”

That’s what a bearded, overweight man brandishing a placard proclaiming solidarity between “Chicago Labor” and their Wisconsin brethren shouted at me when I attempted to interview him at the square in front of the state capitol here.

He was one of a throng of people gathered to oppose the governor. It was the Monday evening before the nationally watched recall election of Republican Gov. Scott Walker.

Union members were furious at controversial measures, which required some public sector employees to pay 6 percent of their pensions and 12 percent of their healthcare premiums, enacted last year. Unions, in and out of the Badger State, collected more than twice the petition signatures required to make Walker only the third governor in U.S. history to face a recall election. Union bosses were particularly upset that Act Ten, the state’s pension and healthcare reform act, also ended collective bargaining for public employees in what was the first state to permit the practice back in 1959.

The intensity of the labor-fueled effort to defeat Walker and elect Democrat Tom Barrett (whom the GOP governor had beaten in 2010) was obvious to anyone walking down State Street in Madison.

The efforts by the governor’s supporters were less visible, but, very clearly, they were there—through phone banks, Internet, mail and television. The governor’s funding-raising reports would indicate he had spent nearly $40 million in the first quarter—“which means he raised more money than any candidate in the country except Mitt Romney and Barack Obama,” noted Wisconsin GOP consultant Scott Becher. In the end, more than 2.5 million voters, or 57 percent of those eligble, voted—the highest turnout in a Wisconsin gubernatorial race since 1962.

Despite exit polls showing the race a toss-up on June 5, it was over in an hour. Walker defeated Barrett with a decisive 53 percent of the vote, Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch survived her recall, and Republicans won three of four races for state senate seats.

There are several lessons to be learned from Scott Walker’s victory in Wisconsin. As one radio talk show said, referring to the nickname often applied to Wisconsinites, “we are all cheeseheads now.”

1. Romney gets a boost

There were 20 headquarters’ for Walker throughout the state and those 20 headquarters could easily become Romney headquarters. Pundits and pols on all sides almost universally concluded that, despite recent polls showing Barack Obama leading Romney in the state, the momentum coming from Walker’s win puts Wisconsin’s 10 electoral votes in play.

Waukesha County Executive Dan Vrakas, whose county had a turnout of more than 70 percent and supported Walker handily, said, “Romney will be here next week. The state went from being leaning blue to leaning red overnight. Gov. Walker put fire in the belly of a lot of people.”

 

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sirjohn
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Re: GREAT DAY FOR AMERICA: SCOTT WALKER WON AND WON BIG

2. Scott Walker, Superstar

The 43-year-old governor was inarguably the man of the hour Tuesday night. Almost immediately, talk radio and the Internet were filled with discussion of how he should be Mitt Romney’s running mate this year or a candidate for president himself next cycle.

Walker is almost sure to be invited to speak throughout the country in coming weeks and likely will be given a primetime speaking role at the Republican National Convention this summer—possibly as the keynote speaker.

3. Unions’ worst night

No question about it. After putting in the all-out effort it did to defeat Walker, labor unions—particularly those representing public employees—came up short.

This defeat could not have come at a worse time for Big Labor. The Wall Street Journal reported recently that the ranks of public unions have dropped dramatically.

Members of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees plunged by two-thirds in recent years—to 7,100 from 22,300—and the American Federation of Teachers has dropped to 6,000 from 17,000, reported the Journal.

In addition, a recent YouGov poll among voters nationwide showed that, when asked if they felt labor unions have more or less influence today than 30 years ago, 21 percent said “more” and a whopping 46 percent said “less.”

4. Odds grow on GOP Senate takeover

The odds on Republicans winning the seat of retiring Wisconsin Democratic Sen. Herb Kohl and thus increasing the odds on a GOP capture of the Senate grew last week.

All four Republican Senate candidates—former Gov. Tommy Thompson, former Rep. Mark Neumann, businessman Eric Hovde, and Assembly Speaker Jeff Fitzgerald—strongly identified themselves with the embattled governor.

Polls now show all four either leading certain Democratic nominee and liberal Democrat Tammy Baldwin or trailing her by a small margin.

5. A prairie fire for pension reform

In terms of policy, the most lasting legacy of Scott Walker’s “walk through fire” could well be an intensified movement in other states to limit what state employees can expect in terms of benefits from state government.

Neighboring Illinois, which is wracked by a massive $83 billion pension system debt, could easily be the next battleground on the issue of pension reform.

With Democrats controlling the governorship and both houses of the legislature, state House GOP Leader Tom Cross was unable to get anywhere with his proposal for reducing cost-of-living increases in teacher retirement plans. But, Republicans are expected to make this a key issue in their fall campaign, when all 59 state senate seats and all 118 house seats are on the ballot.

Bob Williams, former Washington legislator and now president of the Budget Solutions group that seeks answers to problems in the states, has long called unfunded pension liabilities “the dark cloud on the horizon of the states,” totaling trillions of dollars. Walker’s victory, he told Human Events, “will accelerate the movement toward overhaul of the pension system that is just getting started in several states.”

ricfeliu
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Re: GREAT DAY FOR AMERICA: SCOTT WALKER WON AND WON BIG

Según un nuevo sondeo de Latino Decisions , los intentos del Partido Republicano para llegar a los votantes latinos se están quedando completamente plana.

El sondeo, que encuestó a 609 adultos latinos y no latinos de 500 adultos en todos los 50 estados, encontró que los votantes latinos apoyan al presidente, Barack Obama, sobre Mitt Romney por un margen abrumador por ciento 66 a 23. 43 puntos de ventaja de Obama no ha cambiado desde noviembre una latina Decisiones / Univision encuesta que mostró que conduce el presidente Romney el 67 por ciento a 24 por ciento.

Una manera en que la campaña de Romney ha intentado dar la vuelta a sus números con los latinos es dar un papel destacado al cubano-estadounidense El senador Marco Rubio. Por desgracia para Romney, la encuesta muestra que la política de Rubio firma - una versión diluida de la Ley DREAM - es aún menos popular entre los votantes latinos que Romney sí mismo.

87 por ciento de la DREAM Act original de los latinos el apoyo de *beep* Durbin, que proporcionaría la condición de inmigrante indocumentada residente legal de los jóvenes, y, finalmente, un camino a la ciudadanía si asisten a la universidad o servir en el ejército. Sólo el 10 por ciento se opone.

Ley de Rubio DREAM, que proporcionaría los jóvenes indocumentados que asistan a la universidad o servir en el estado militar temporal con una visa renovable - sin camino a la ciudadanía - con el apoyo de sólo el 46 por ciento de los latinos, en comparación con el 44 por ciento que se oponen a ella.

Cuando se le preguntó a elegir entre las dos propuestas, los latinos apoyan el plan de Durbin por un margen abrumador por ciento de 82 a 13. En otras palabras, si se compara con la propuesta Democrática y respaldado por la Ley de Rubio DREAM es aún menos popular que el hombre cuyo plan de la inmigración se reduce a "deportar a ti mismo."

De una forma u otra, Romney tendrá que mejorar estos números para tener alguna esperanza de ganar las elecciones. Si el presidente Obama es capaz de barrer los latinos llenos de estados indecisos, como Colorado, Nevada, Nuevo México y Arizona, a continuación, Romney tendrá casi ningún camino a la Casa Blanca.



Más en Univision.com: http://foro.univision.com/t5/Noticias-y-Pol%C3%ADtica-en-Estados-Unidos/T%C3%BA-a-qui%C3%A9nes-apoya...